Tranny Politics : part I

Posted: January 6, 2009 in Uncategorized

I liked my teal snood so much that I got two more, this white one and a hot pink one. The pea coat and leg warmers are from H&M. Have I mentioned that I heart H&M? It should be on every tranny’s shopping route.

This shot is a good example of how femenine bodies can be manufactured by the fashion industry. The coat has a fitted waist that creates a girly figure where not exists. I would love to read an actor network theory analysis of the construction of femininity. Girls are defined by girly bodies. Any girl without a girly body will be provided one by the fashion industry, or failing that the medical industry. End result, the overlap between mens and womens bodies are erased from cultural memory.

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I am more comfortable with the label femme than the label woman. Partly because it is an open self identification and a clearly social construction. I label myself femme and no gatekeepers are going to get in my face and tell me that I am not a real femme. Other labels are much more contentious. Julia Serano clearly wants to fight for the labels woman, lesbian and feminist. Personally, I find these categories too rooted in a male/female opposition. Feminism and lesbian separatism are founded on an either/or logic. They are founded upon gender, and I can say I am a woman or a lesbian as much as I want, but too many self-identified lesbians and radical feminists will take issue with that.

It seems to be acceptable for public feminist intellectuals like Germaine Greer to write hate filled sneering attacks against trans women without being held accountable by other women, because when the sides are drawn group loyalty goes to the ‘real’ woman and not the victim of her hatred. As long as the womens movement and the lesbian-movements are founded on the gender binary we can only be second class citizens when we request inclusion in them.
It does not matter how marginalized trans girls are by the patriarchy, we are easy targets for other victims of gender, racial or class oppression. We are the untouchables who can ‘legitimately’ be targeted for ridicule, exclusion and violence. This silent majority attitude can be summed up with the stereotypical German response after WWII ‘Ich habe nicht gewusst.’ (I did not know.)

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